Charles Clay’s Longstanding Knee Problem

Assessing Charles Clay longstanding knee complaints and identifying the root cause of the problem

Injury wise, things are slow right now at One Bills Drive and I couldn’t be happier!! If you read my last post, you were able to see that the Buffalo Bills have so far been very fortunate keeping the injuries to a minimum. Jury is still out on whether it is the practice habits of Sean McDermott and company or if the football gods have mercy on all that is Buffalo. If the fans have to suffer through 2 preseason losses with 10+ penalties a game or a star player going down with a season ending injury, I’ll gladly take the former. As there have been no serious injuries to report, I have been able to look at nagging injuries such as Cordy Glenn and recoveries such as Reggie Ragland. Today’s post will evaluate TE Charles Clay knee complaints.

Charles Clay was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the 6th round of the 2011 NFL draft out of Tulsa. Clay spent four productive years in Miami, after which time, during the 2015 off season, signed a five-year, $38 million contract with the Bills to add a new dimension to the passing game. Going into his 3rd year with the Bills, Clay has managed to play 27 of a 32 possible games for the Bills, bringing in 105 receptions for 1,060 yards and 7 TD’s. However, since Clay has come to Buffalo, the games and practices that he has missed have been due to knee complaints.

The fact that Clay only misses practice and occasional games immediately eliminates the possible serious injuries such as fractures and ligament tears. This allows creates the possibility of chronic conditions leaving several to consider. Sports Injury Predictor lists all of Clay’s significant injury history and Fox Sports lists when he has been on the weekly injury report. Most of his injury history consists of his knee along with occasional back, hamstring, and calf injuries. Knowing what is published from media reports, this is a chronic condition. Reports from various sources that can be found from ESPN, The Phins Insider, and Palm Beach Post all indicate that this has been an ongoing issue, that there have been complications, but never identify the exact injury.

Diving into the differential diagnosis of the possible complaint, there are several options. I have already ruled out serious ligament damage or fractures. There are other possible diagnosis that do not warrant consideration at this time due to unlikelihood or rarity. This leaves 3 potential diagnosis to consider: Osteoarthritis, meniscal injury, or knee bursitis. Osteoarthritis, known generally as arthritis, is a degenerative condition in where the ends of the joint are covered in a smooth material called articular cartilage. This material is found on the ends of every freely moving joint surface in the body. Over time, this cartilage can wear down due to injury and poor management/healing. Studies have been performed demonstrating that consistent exercise and proper injury recovery over time can help keep these joint surfaces healthy. This supports why not everyone requires knee replacements once they hit a certain age. In addition, my clinical experiences have shown that arthritic knees do not swell up rapidly and often, especially at Clay’s young age. Unfortunately, this may be an expected outcome once Clay’s playing days are completed. He may already have some degenerative changes, but I can say with strong certainty that this is not the source of Clay’s complaints.

Another diagnosis that is a strong consideration is meniscal injury. This diagnosis is possible due to his known surgical history from 2012 to repair a torn meniscus which sent him to the IR while with the Dolphins. The meniscus acts as a shock absorber in the knee, helps disperse weight between the femur and tibia, and maintain structural integrity during movement. However, a repaired meniscus typically would not cause chronic issues for 4+ years in my professional experience. Clay did have an arthroscopic surgery during the 2014 off season to clean out his knee which most likely cleaned out any loose bodies or shaving down the meniscus due to fraying. He was cleared to practice shortly after, but then began experiencing further complications limiting his practice during the preseason. However, if he were to have a meniscal tear or fraying, the surgery would have corrected it and would not continue to have chronic issues.

This leaves knee bursitis as the reasonable diagnosis. Bursitis is a condition in where the bursa in the joint becomes inflamed. Bursa are fluid filled pockets in the joint that secrete a fluid known as synovial fluid which helps keep the joint lubricated and reduce the friction between joints. Think of the effects of motor oil in an engine. Sometimes, when a separate injury occurs, the bursa in the injured joint can become inflamed as a result. Returning back to practice sooner than expected could add extra stress to the joint and cause swelling. Direct blows to the knee can also cause the bursa to become inflamed, such as falling directly on the knee or striking it against a helmet/body part. There are multiple bursa around the knee resides that could be damaged. Surgery could be performed to remove the offending bursa, but this may cause the player to miss more time than expected and is rarely performed. This can be a chronic condition that takes some time to resolve.

I believe this is the appropriate diagnosis due to this supporting articles from ESPN and The Buffalo News. This indicates that it is knee bursitis due to repeated swelling and drainage, the lack of immediate concern, and his ability to play most games despite the current complaints. At worst, it is an annoyance which can cause pain, swelling, and keep Clay from producing on the field. If you would like additional information on knee bursitis, you can find them here, here, and here.

Having been to Bills preseason practice along with observing game film and pictures, Clay has not been seen wearing a bulky brace, indicating possible joint instability. Instead, he is seen wearing a neoprene sleeve, allowing for compression of the joint and reducing the possible incidence of recurring swelling during strenuous activity. Clay’s production has not been significantly slowed compared to others at his position. Considering the amount of money that Clay is paid, it is the public expectations that he produces at a greater output. It would also be beneficial if Tyrod Taylor were able to improve his passing abilities, but that’s a discussion better left to my friends at The Rockpile Report.

Considering that Clay hasn’t missed any games yet this preseason and has only been slowed at practice, this is not a cause for concern. However, the team must continue to effectively manage the knee so as not to exacerbate it and cause further complications. He may be dealing with something that is not aware to anyone but him, the coaches, and his doctors which if known, could drastically alter my thought process and discussion. I believe that Clay will be able to perform at a consistent level this season, occasionally requiring down time to ensure that he does not create further damage to the knee.

Preseason Injury Breakdown- Part I

In depth analysis of the injuries occurring around the league. This article highlights areas of concern and injuries through the 1st preseason games.

Since Sunday’s post, every NFL team has played one preseason game. Depending on which fan base you speak to, it has either been a fantastic or horrible preseason. I’m willing to wager that those that rate their team’s preseason as horrible may be due to injury. If you’ve been following Twitter, ESPN, or local news, there’s been numerous reports about the significant injuries that have possibly derailed the regular season before it has even begun.

I have previously mentioned that I am focusing this blog on Buffalo Bills injuries. However, as I am a Physical Therapist, this allows me to expand as I wish into other areas of interest. Since the beginning of the preseason, I have been tracking nearly every injury that has occurred in camps around the NFL. Injuries that I deem worth tracking are ones that force a player to miss extended time, season ending, or placed on injured reserve. For my analysis, these injuries must have occurred during the preseason. Those that had off season injuries/surgeries or injuries from last year that are still recovering are not included in this analysis. This allows for a more specific time frame to be assessed. As of publication, I fully expect these numbers will change. Players will continue to get injured, waived, and reach injury settlements. My goal with this article is to highlight areas of interest and concern.

Of what has been publicly reported so far, there has been 119 players that have been either placed on injury reserve or expected to miss significant time. Of those 119 players, 26 have been released with injury settlements, allowing them to heal on their own time, get compensated, and seek out opportunities with other teams once they are cleared. If you would like additional information about the waived/injured status and process of injury settlements, please check out this article. Most of these injuries consist of hamstring pulls, ankle sprains, and unknown/undisclosed injuries. The most unique injuries of this group are a bruised lung and a Jones fracture, the same type of foot injury that sent Sammy Watkins packing to the Rams.

Of the 93 remaining players, 16 of these players have not been placed on injured reserve. These injuries consist of rather significant injuries consisting of various fractures and surgeries. These are injuries that the teams has deemed not appropriate to use the designated to return tag on injury reserve. If they used this tag, this would prevent the player from being cleared to play until at least Week 8. Considering that all NFL teams do not have to cut down rosters to 53 until September 2nd, there is incentive to allow these players to rehab and have them ready by Week 1.

This leaves 77 players whose seasons have ended before they even began. Think about that for a second, you have nearly a full roster and a half of NFL caliber players sitting on the sidelines recovering from injuries. Remember, the NFL has only played one preseason game so far. There are 32 teams in the NFL of 53 players on each active roster equating to 1,696 players. With the already injured players, you could add a 33rd team without difficulty if these players were healthy. Most of these teams have been in camp for only 3 weeks. While that is sinking in, I will continue to break down the injuries.

One of the highlighted injuries we see too often is ACL tears. Highlights of the mechanism of injury have been previously highlighted in my Reggie Ragland post. Already, we have seen 18 ACL tears and this is not stopping. Of all of the tears, 16 have been reported as ACL only, 1 reported as ACL, MCL, and 1 reported as ACL, MCL, PCL. Looking back at the past two years of training camp, 2016 training camp totals saw 16 ACL tears and 2015 training camp totals saw 15 ACL tears. At this rate, it would realistic to see the final number for this preseason reach the mid 20’s, possibly even equal the past two years combined. Of the 18 tears, 11 are defensive players, 5 are offensive players, and 1 special teams player.

One area that has improved so far is Achilles’ tears. To date, there have been 3 Achilles’ tears, compared to 6 in 2016 and 7 in 2015. Of the Achilles’ tears, 2 are defensive players, 1 is offensive. Breaking down the rest of the injuries briefly, several injuries of concern consist of spinal injuries which include lumbar and cervical complaints. Other injuries include torn hamstrings, pectoral tears, sports hernias, wrist dislocation/fractures, concussion, or undisclosed.

This is just a small sample size of what we as fans are seeing. There may be even more that have not been publicly disclosed yet or details still emerging. The NFL still has just over 3 weeks until Week 1 kickoff. I can tell you with the utmost certainty that these types of injuries will continue to occur. I expect some types of these injuries to decline as players continue to improve their conditioning and skills required for their position. I also expect these injuries to occur occasionally at practice and but with a higher frequency in preseason games. We have already seen stars such as Ryan Tannehill go down for the season during practice. I expect to see several other bigger name players go down for some time. Assume that players on the roster bubble to be the bulk of the serious injuries that remain. Several veterans have been injured, but of the 119 players injured so far, 98 of these players have 3 years or less NFL experience, which is the typical length of an NFL career.

Finally, I will take a brief look at teams who have been hit hard by the injury bug versus those that have mostly escaped major injury. Of the 32 teams, several have been hit quite hard. Leading the count with 8 players significantly injured or on IR are the 49ers, Dolphins, and Ravens. Following behind with 7 players are the Colts, Jets and Jaguars. Next with 5 players are the Chargers, Chiefs, Lions, and Redskins. The rest of the teams have 4 or less on IR. Two teams that I want to specifically highlight are the Buffalo Bills and the New England Patriots. The Buffalo Bills have only had 1 player be placed on injury reserve so far; Keith Towbridge with a foot injury. As much as I hate to state this, the New England Patriots are the only team that I have found to not have anyone seriously injured during this year’s training camp.

While I am a Physical Therapist and could continue to go down the rabbit hole with these injuries, I will save my commentary for future blog posts. Take these numbers for what they’re worth. Football is a rough sport, these statistics prove it. I would like to give credit to NFL Trade Rumors, Spotrac, and ESPN for providing the raw data and updates necessary for this post. As a fan and professional, I hope that the injuries for the Bills continue to occur at a minimum, allowing them to go into the season with the depth required to be successful. Continue to check back for future posts updating these stats along with further analysis of specific injuries.

Billsiest Injury Yet!!

Analyzing Jordan Matthews unique injury during the first practice with the Bills.

If you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably missed the blockbuster trades made by the Bills on Friday. If you would like further details as you were under previously said rock, please educate yourself here. Now that you are refreshed, one of the new acquisitions of the trade, Jordan Matthews, has already been injured. Yes, a Buffalo Bills player has gotten injured! Not your typical pulled hamstring, rolled ankle, or tender shoulder. No, this injury is unique. Jordan Matthews sustained a chip fracture of his sternum. This is a common injury found in motor vehicle accidents when the person’s chest strikes the steering wheel upon impact. This type of injury also occurs from chest compression’s during CPR. If I were to theorize how a football player were to sustain this injury, I would assume that the player would be lit up and a chip fracture would be the least of his worries.

According to the Bills, Matthews sustained the injury while going to the ground hard during a drill with a defensive back. It was reported that he finished practice but complained of issues later. Symptoms include pain, tenderness, bruising, and swelling, along with a deformity present during breathing. Most likely, diagnosis was confirmed via X-ray. Thankfully, this injury is not serious, but it is something worth noting. According to reports such as Dr. David Chao, Matthews will be fine, but be limited secondary to pain. I expect him to limit chest movements such as weightlifting, blocking drills, and strenuous upper arm movements. This is due to the pectoral muscles attached to the area that pull and cause discomfort the more the muscle is worked. He will require rest, anti-inflammatories, and time to heal. While it is unfortunate, I believe this will allow him to study the playbook and recover so this isn’t something that becomes a nuisance over the season. Expect him to miss the upcoming preseason game against the Eagles to rest, limit reps against the Ravens, and return to full form by the 4th preseason game.

Thankfully, this wasn’t a serious injury or something that will cause recurrent problems. For us Bills fans that have had season hopes and dreams dashed by ill timed injuries, ineptitude, and just plain bad luck, this only adds to it. This is one of the more Billsiest injuries of recent memory, but something that will become a distant memory by the time the season opener against the Jets. The Bills have had a relatively injury free training camp devoid of the ACL and Achilles tear, broken bones, and serious injuries that have hampered the rest of the NFL. Continue to check back for updates, news, and further Bills injury analysis not found anywhere else!

Trade Alert!!

Breaking down the injury histories of the players Buffalo acquired during the trades made yesterday with the Rams and Eagles.

Trade alert, trade alert!! The Bills are making moves!! To recap, the Bills traded WR Sammy Watkins and a 2018 6th Rd draft pick to the Rams for CB E.J. Gaines and a 2018 2nd Rd draft pick. Also traded was CB Ronald Darby to the Philadelphia Eagles for WR Jordan Matthews and a 2018 3rd Rd draft pick. Whether you are a negative Nancy or a positive Peter dictates how you feel about this trade. A lot of talk has been made regarding whether the Bills are tanking and stockpiling draft picks. I don’t believe this to be the case. I believe the Bills are making moves to build through the draft while not sacrificing the present. They are are the Buffalo Bills, not the Cleveland Browns. They share the same lake, but not the same approach. Buffalo now owns 6 draft choices in the first 90 picks in next years draft and a team that can win more than 1 game in a season. This allows flexibility to build a winner while not sacrificing this year’s team. Yes, the Bills lost some talent, but not depth, and they picked up pieces to build for the future.

Sammy Watkins has left a lot to be desired during his time in Buffalo, having missed key portions of each season due to injuries. The Bills also declined the 5th year option on his rookie deal, making Watkins a free agent after the season. The likelihood of the Bills signing him to a long term deal was possible, but would have come at a steep price due to the ever increasing amount teams willing to pay for talent. The Bills were smart to move Watkins while his value was high, obtaining draft capital and a CB to reinforce the secondary which was shown to be horrendous last season.

It has been heavily documented that Sammy Watkins suffered a Jones fracture which has required 2 surgeries and uncertainty of returning to form without complications. The previously linked article from Buffalo Rumblings is an excellent read, got to give credit where it’s due! Besides the Jones fracture, Watkins has sustained numerous injuries including a hip labrum tear and ankle, calf, thigh, groin, and rib injuries during his time with the Bills. While his stats have lined up with his contemporaries in the 2014 NFL draft when on the field, Watkins missing time is more crucial due to the Bills relying on his abilities alone in order to win. As a fan, I would rather have a lesser talent who can participate weekly with the team than someone who isn’t certain to contribute.

Breaking down E.J. Gaines injury history, which includes a 2014 concussion that was sustained in Week 16 and a thigh injury sustained in 2016 towards the end of the season are worth mentioning. The only major injury Gaines has sustained is a Lisfranc injury during training camp in 2015 which caused him to miss the entire season. The injury occurred due to Kenny Britt stepping on his foot during practice. A Lisfranc injury is where the long bones in the foot called the metatarsals that connect to the cuboid bones in the mid-foot become fractured or dislocated. In Gaines case, stepping on the foot caused the injury. In other cases, falling forward when the toes are pointed down can cause this injury. It is not a sexy way to seriously injury one’s self. In all cases, surgery is recommended if there is a fracture or dislocation. While this injury is serious, it is one that appears to be less complex, such as the complications that Watkins has had with his foot injury. Besides arthritis in the coming years, I don’t anticipate that this will continue to hamper Gaines’ production in the defense.

Analyzing Jordan Matthews injury history, he has sustained injuries including a sprained ankle at the end of the 2016 season, knee tendinitis in 2016-2017, back spasms in 2016, and an oblique injury in 2014. Besides the ankle sprain that limited him at the end of last season, there isn’t much that has prevented Matthews from contributing. The knee tendinitis is somewhat of a concern as it can continue to linger, but hasn’t caused him to miss any time. He has produced with consistency that has puts him with elite company. I am hard pressed to find a player who does not deal with some sort of injury throughout the NFL season. What I am concerned about is the extent of time missed due to injury and complications with returning to full health such as Watkins. I do not see these concerns with Matthews. While not all injuries can be prevented, it is important to understand how the injuries occur and the lasting impacts it has on player performance. It remains to be seen how this trade will play out in the coming season and years.

While there are many more discussions regarding the players and their performance on the field, I believe the Bills came away with solid draft picks allowing them to find players who can help them win. I also believe that player wise, the Bills moved players who could continue to be a liability on the field for players that are proven at what they do. They also do not have as significant injury histories, allowing them to stay healthy and contribute towards winning and building depth for the season.

Football Is Back!

Breaking down the Bills performance and noted injuries after the first preseason game.

Football is back! The Buffalo Bills played the Minnesota Vikings last night in a 7 pm tilt at New Era Field to a 17-10 loss where we were able to finally see the McDermott era begin. While this is preseason and there isn’t much to take away from this first game, we do get to see who is ready for game time action and how some of the new acquired pieces are fitting together. While I did not watch the entire game, I was impressed with what the first team units were able to produce. Eddie Yarbrough was solid in his debut in a Bills uniform, constantly pressuring the QB and recording a solid sack filling in for the injured Shaq Lawson, out with a groin injury. Nathan Peterman moved the offense along and got the team back into contention with his first passing TD to Dez Lewis towards the end, though came up short. The running game continues to remain a strong focus of the offense, looking especially effective with Jonathan Williams and Mike Tolbert barreling through the line picking up solid yardage. Tyrod Taylor looked excellent getting the ball to Sammy Watkins, who showed no hitch in his step hauling in several catches before his day was done.

But Dr. Trimble, you stated this would be a blog about Buffalo Bills football injuries? Indeed it is reader! I would like to note that the Bills got through this game without any significant injuries. Prior to the game, it was reported that Shaq Lawson, Cordy Glenn, Kevon Seymour, Jeremy Butler, and Ryan Davis would be held out due to a variety of ailments, none that I expect are long term issues. Lawson, Glenn, and Seymour held out as a precaution; Butler and Davis still currently in the concussion protocol.

Thankfully, no serious injuries or concerns were noted for the Bills during the post game. Injuries to note were Tyrod Taylor exiting the game early to be evaluated by the training staff and quickly returning to the game. Also reported was Jonathan Williams exiting the game with a hamstring injury which was described as “very minor”. Expect Williams to either sit out a practice or two at most, but not to miss any extended time or even the next game based on current analysis.

The final player to leave the game for the Bills was LB Tanner Vallejo, the team’s 2017 6th round draft pick, with a shoulder injury. It is currently unknown which play injured Vallejo. As he was deemed questionable and then downgraded to out signifies that it is not a serious injury. Quite possibly, Vallejo landed hard on his shoulder during a play, leading to a slight AC sprain, which if not addressed right away, can worsen with continued play. With it being a preseason game, there wasn’t any incentive to put him back in and cause further injury. I expect Vallejo to possibly sit out several practices and restrict direct contact for the time being. At worst, he will miss a game as a precaution, but I do not expect this injury to keep him sidelined for long.

Unlike the Dolphins and Jets, who have sustained significant and long term injuries to key players, the Bills have not been bitten by the injury bug so far this training camp. As a Bills fan, I find that I am an eternal optimist with the team expectations at the beginning of each season. However, I do expect some guys to get banged up or miss some time. The NFL is a rough sport, players will get hurt. If this first game was any indication, things are looking good. Performances like this will allow the Bills to minimize injuries going into the season opener with the starters healthy and finally having the depth they’ve lacked on the roster for several years.

Cordy Glenn-Perpetually injured

Analyzing/speculating on the lingering ankle injury and how it impacts Glenn’s performance

Cordy Glenn injured his ankle in the preseason of 2016 and has been dealing with the injury ever since. Due to the rigors of the NFL schedule, it is common to deal with nagging injuries that never fully heal during the season. However, due to the Bills ongoing playoff drought, Glenn has not seen the post season since joining the team which means that Glenn has extra time to rehab his ankle. It has been nearly a year since his original injury and yet he still has not returned to full health according to reports. High ankle sprains can fully heal without complication typically, but in Glenn’s case, it continues to be an ongoing issue.

Usually, high ankle sprains require 6 weeks to heal, but can take longer depending on the severity of the sprain. A sprain occurs when the ligaments that stabilizes the connections between the bones becomes damaged which results in instability and an inability of the joint to function properly. In the case of a high ankle sprain, the top of the fibula, the bone that connects on the outside part of the leg near the knee to the tibia via the syndesmotic ligaments, becomes damaged. This is due to stress being placed on the outside part of the ankle, higher than where an individual would roll the foot under during a true ankle sprain. Stresses at a higher level either forces the higher portion of the fibula to pull away from the tibia, causing a sprain. If the foot is fixed into place and the force is great enough, the fibula can break. These forces during the injury are typically seen as external rotation, also known as outward twisting of the foot. Considering the movement of the guard position, plus the 300 lb. bodies falling on top of each other into a massive heap explains why he injured the ankle in the first place. Glenn was placed in a walking boot to stabilize the initial injury and appeared to heal enough to start Week 1 of the NFL season. Glenn then re-injured it during the season opener which caused him to miss the next 3 games. Most likely Glenn originally sustained a Grade 2 injury leading him to sit out the preseason, re-aggravating the injury to a possible Grade 3 later on. Glenn was able to play the rest of the season, missing several games, but clearly not at 100%.

With Grade 3 sprains, the presentation is where the ligament has ruptured, in which the attachment has completely torn or has become so damaged that it can no longer provide effective support. If Glenn did sustain a Grade 3 sprain, surgery is usually recommended, though not always a given. There has been no reports out stating that Glenn had surgery to stabilize the ankle, but considering he is still dealing with the injury, it is quite possible it was not publicly disclosed. The healing time can be anywhere from 3 to 6 months depending on severity of injury. Considering that the Bills season ended at the end of December and that he was not a full participant for OTA’s, the timeline would fit as to why he is not at full health.

Another possibility is that Glenn may also be dealing with chronic ankle instability. This is the result of a recurrent injury leading to deficits in posture control, proprioception, muscle reaction time, and strength leading to a delayed recovery time. This is also more likely due to the demands of the offensive lineman position. Most actions require strategic blocking performing lateral shifting, re-positioning his stance, and driving forward to maintain balance and power required for the position. Rehab for this involves significant focus on balance retraining on the involved foot, progressive loading, and bracing.

Based on the available reports published, it is possible that it is either one of the two scenarios. Both have positive outcomes, but does explain why Glenn is not at 100%. As of August 4th, Glenn is still continuing to deal with potentially the same issues. He has been held out of practice, citing “foot soreness”. It was reported that he went to Charlotte, NC to see Dr. Robert Anderson, a nationally known physician specializing in foot and ankle injuries. Glenn has since returned to practice since the evaluation. While this is continually frustrating being a Bills fan; as a professional, I would rather have the athlete ensure that they are at 100%. At this level, it is not wise to ignore nagging pain, soreness, or small injuries that can lead to further complications down the line. Expect him to be limited in the preseason so as not to aggravate the healing injury. Ideally, Glenn returns to full health for Week 1 and stay healthy to provide effective blocking for the offense to perform at its best.

Welcome!!

A Buffalo Bills Injury blog. Analyzing, educating and writing about the injuries of the Buffalo Bills.

My name is Dr. Kyle Trimble and I am, first and foremost, a Buffalo Bills fan!!  I am proud to call myself a Bills fan; a group of fans that commonly refer to themselves as the Bills Mafia, individuals who are passionate, devoted, and yearning for a winner after far too many years of bad to at best, mediocre football.  When I am not reading, watching, or listening about the Bills, I work as a Physical Therapist.  Being a Buffalo Bills fan for the better part of 10 years; I have experienced some highs, many lows, and a lot of what ifs.  Most commonly I hear, what if (insert player name) didn’t get hurt?  Or, too bad (insert player name) got hurt, now we have to rely on (insert horrible backup), our season is done!

My purpose of this blog is to report on the goings on of the Buffalo Bills injuries.  I will analyze different aspects such as why the player got injured, how the injury typically occurs, speculate on the extent of the injury, timeline the player may be out, and the impact it has on the team.

While I could keep busy with injuries from the Buffalo Bills, this blog will not be limited to solely the Buffalo Bills.  Based on significant player injuries around the NFL, trends, research, and questions; I will write on whatever is on my mind, and whatever questions, you, the reader may have.  I write because I enjoy it, I write because I like to educate, and I believe that a fan that is educated on how injuries affect their favorite team can have a more realistic view on the NFL season.

To give a background on myself; I was born and raised in Erie, PA, moved to Buffalo in 2006 to begin my studies at D’Youville College towards becoming a Physical Therapist at which time I became a devoted Buffalo Bills fan.  I graduate in 2013 with my Doctorate in Physical Therapy and moved home for several years.  Moving back to the Buffalo area in 2016, I have gained extensive experience in outpatient orthopedics, skilled nursing, acute care hospital, and home care.  Having obtained a significant wealth of knowledge that continues to grow, along with a undying fandom of the Bills, puts me in the unique position to educate my fellow fans about our great team. To add, I am an contributor and occasional guest on the Buffalo Bills podcast, The Rockpile Report.  I have many ideas to write about, many which I expect you will enjoy.  I welcome any comments or questions you may have.